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todayinlaborhistory: Today in labor history, September 1, 2014: Today is Labor Day. In 1894, after sending in the Army and U.S. Marshals to break the Pullman strike, President Grover Cleveland’s popularity was in the toilet. In the immediate wake of the strike, legislation designating a federal Labor Day holiday was rushed unanimously through Congress and arrived on Cleveland’s desk for his signature. 
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Steven Perez posted on Tumblr

sinidentidades: The racist immigrants carry disease rhetoric is nothing new.  Perhaps we need a U.S. history lesson: Under President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the U.S. forged a program, through a series of agreements with Mexico’s PRI-dominated government, called the Bracero program. This program was used to fill in the gaps in manual labor the U.S. had after the war. It sounds like a liberal dream: immigrants being given an opportunity to work in the “land of opportunity,” yet it was hardly that. The laborers were forced into horrible working conditions. Many died from exhaustion (often from working in the sun too long) from working in the fields picking food for the U.S. Many also suffered from disease. The U.S. decided what was best for the issue of disease: a widespread use of a highly toxic livestock pesticide that braceros were often doused in as part of processing into the U.S.
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Steven Perez posted on Tumblr

Some of the factual assertions in recent amicus briefs would not pass muster in a high school research paper. But that has not stopped the Supreme Court from relying on them. Recent opinions have cited “facts” from amicus briefs that were backed up by blog posts, emails or nothing at all. Some amicus briefs are careful and valuable, of course, citing peer-reviewed studies and noting contrary evidence. Others cite more questionable materials. Some “studies” presented in amicus briefs were paid for or conducted by the group that submitted the brief and published only on the Internet. Some studies seem to have been created for the purpose of influencing the Supreme Court. Yet the justices are quite receptive to this dodgy data. Over the five terms from 2008 to 2013, the court’s opinions cited factual assertions from amicus briefs 124 times, Professor Larsen found. The phenomenon is novel. “The U.S. Supreme Court is the only American judicial entity that depends so heavily on amicus briefs to educate itself on factual matters,” Professor Larsen wrote. The trend is at odds with the ordinary role of appellate courts, which are not supposed to be in the business of determining facts. That is the job of the trial court, where evidence is submitted, sifted and subjected to the adversary process. Appellate courts traditionally take those facts, fixed in the trial court record, as a given. Their job is to identify and apply legal principles to those facts.

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Steven Perez posted on Tumblr

President Bush declared Iraq a 'catastrophic success' ten years ago

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Steven Perez posted on Tumblr

breakingnews: FBI investigating alleged photo hack of Jennifer Lawrence, others NBC News: The FBI and Apple announced Monday that they are investigating an apparent hacking of iCloud accounts that lead to photos of Jennifer Lawrence and other female stars being posted online. A spokesperson for Lawrence said the incident was “a flagrant violation of privacy” and that authorities were poised to prosecute anyone who posted the photos. Follow updates on BreakingNews.com. Photo: Actress Jennifer Lawrence on the red carpet of the 2014 Academy Awards. Jordan Strauss / AP
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yamamiya posted on Tumblr

予感システム

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Mitì Vigliero posted on Tumblr

Oh sì, hai messo la musica che amo di più ballare…arrivo subito! 
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Steven Perez posted on Tumblr

dailykos: It’s Labor Day.
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Steady My Heart di Kari Jobe
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GM posted on Tumblr

Coppie Miste, su Real Time un nuovo format sugli amori interculturali